Sporting Event Security Guard Jobs in Los Angeles

Sporting Event Security Jobs in Los Angeles

We have employment opportunities for the highest paying upcoming sports, entertainment and music events! NOW RECRUITING for the DESERT TRIP! 

Image result for desert trip

 

Event : Desert Trip in Indio, CA:

Date: Friday Oct. 14-16 2016

Shift Time: 12:30pm-1:00am

Learn more about the event by going here: http://deserttrip.com/

 

Security Guard Job Requirements:

  • Must have a valid BSIS guard card and government issued picture ID
  • Be at least 18 years of age.
  • Have valid authorization to work in the U.S.
  • Have a reliable means of communication.
  • Have a reliable means of transportation.
  • Must have a High School Diploma or GED
  • Must have a clean criminal record
  • Must be able to perform designated job duties and abide by company/industry policies and procedures

Security Officer Skills and Qualifications:

  • Must be healthy, be able to stand for long periods, be able to perform pat down searches and work in the sun.
  • Able to observe and report (verbally and in writing) all incidents that may occur at the post
  • Able to bend down, lift and carry up to 50 pounds
  • Hair must be brushed or combed and clean shaven. Handlebar mustaches, beards, and goatees are not acceptable
  • No Mohawks, Cornrows, Dreadlocks, Extremely Loud Hair Colors
  • Tattoos must not be on face or neck areas.
  • Excellent customer service
  • Excellent verbal and written skills
  • Organized, punctual, and energetic personality

Applicant must submit resume and include contact information (I.e. phone, email) to info@fortressguardservices.com

It is important that you please bring the following to your interview:

  • Guard Card (If you don’t have a guard card, we can help you attain one)
  • Photo ID
  • Social Security Card

We are looking for highly qualified security officers with flexible schedules and a positive attitude. 

Previous Security Guard Events: 

  • UCLA vs Stanford @ the Rosebowl
  • USC vs. UTAH @ the LA Coliseum
  • Cold Play Concert @ the the Rosebowl
  • Rams Games @ the LA Coliseum
  • Chelsea vs Liverpool Soccer Game
  • HARD SUMMER @ Pomona Fairplex

Fortress Guard Services pledges to provide the very best in security and personal protection services. Using an employee workforce that is

highly diverse, we are able to meet our clients’ needs by putting their satisfaction and security first and foremost. We demand the best from
our security agents and our management team at all times.

Our staff recognizes the diversity of our clients and strives to represent them in the most professional manner possible, respecting their privacy and providing the highest level of service in the security industry today. We understand security and have the knowledge and experience to understand how to implement the correct security solutions for your facilities. We look forward to serving you, and welcome your call to discuss your security options. Feel free to call us today to find an opportunity that is right for your schedule: 310-970-9804

Hiring Professional Security Officers

Fortress Guard Service is now hiring Professional Security Officers for one of Southern California’s largest music festivals LIMITED POSITIONS AVAILABLE. Candidates must meet the following requirements: – Valid CA Guard Card. No exceptions. – Excellent customer service. – Excellent verbal and written skills – Must be efficient, punctual, and energetic and have a positive attitude.

Please submit resume and include contact information (phone, email) When applying please bring the following: – Guard Card (If you don’t have a guard card, we will help you obtain one) – Photo ID – Social Security Card
We are looking for highly qualified security officers with flexible schedules and positive attitudes

 

Seeking Qualified Security Officers for Northern California events

Fortress Guard Service is now hiring Professional Event Security Officers in Northern California

 

We have employment opportunities for upcoming sports, entertainment and music events.

UNLIMITED POSITIONS AVAILABLE. Candidates must meet the following requirements

  • Valid CA Guard Card
  • Excellent customer service
  • Excellent verbal and written skills
  • Organized, punctual, and energetic personality.It is important that you please bring the following to your interview:

 

Applicant must send resume and include contact information (I.e. phone, email) to info@fortressguardservices.com

  • Guard Card (If you don’t have a guard card, we can help you attain one)
  • Photo ID
  • Social Security Card

 

We are looking for highly qualified security officers with flexible schedules and positive attitude

Implementing An Executive Protection Program

by Edward Limoges,Director of Operations, Protection Resources International

Those who are responsible for the safety and security of elected officials or corporate executives are facing new challenges. These challenges are created by a shift in how senior corporate leaders and elected officials are viewed by society at large.  In the age of Social Media, leaders face criticism and scorn for what some may deem a controversial position, and in hours that criticism can reach hundreds of thousands of people.  With a negative message getting into cyberspace they are confronted with a serious risk from fringe groups and lone activists who are determined to use extreme means to make an example of corporations or the political system beliefs which they  perceived in a negative light.

To negate this risk security departments are implementing executive protection programs.  The role of Executive Protection (EP) is not just the physical safety of their charges, but the company’s or an official’s reputation as a whole, in doing so they face challenges that can be surmounted with proper planning and preparation.
The first step in the planning and preparation process is to develop a realistic understanding of the scope of threats, risks, and vulnerabilities faced by senior decision makers in the organization, and that the findings are clearly communicated to them.
Threats, risks, and vulnerabilities are separate concepts:
  • A threat is a declaration or indication of imminent danger or harm.
  • A risk is a possible injury or loss.
  • Vulnerability is an injury or loss that is possible but not necessarily probable or improbable.
All of these sound similar, the easiest way to differentiate them is to remember that a threat is something that will happen unless action is taken, a risk is something that probably could happen, and vulnerability is something that can happen even though it might be highly unlikely.
An assessment process should be undertaken to gauge the Threat/Risk/Vulnerability issues. Factors such as type of industry that the organization is in, the notoriety of the corporate or elected official, and the opposition groups they may encounter. This is a time intensive and in depth process that should be managed by a professional with experience in doing it.  Very often, an outside consultant is the best option for managing this process.  They will give you an objective assessment of the most pertinent issues that the EP program will need to focus on.
Once the assessment phase is complete a program outline will need to be developed based on the threats, risks, and vulnerabilities that were identified.  The program outline will try to address the identified issues through a spectrum of mitigation strategies that will be cost effective. Although every situation is unique, there are mitigation strategies that are common to most of them such as the use of trained security drivers, protective intelligence gathering and analysis, special procedures and plans for public and private events, surveillance detection programs, and close protection. These mitigation strategies require an understanding of tax implications that come with them.
Screen Shot 2014-01-07 at 11.00.58 AMThere is a common misconception that close protection, the use of executive protection specialists or “bodyguards”, is the first and only answer. In fact, in terms of effectiveness of mitigation, for both corporate leaders and elected officials, they are almost the last answer. Protective intelligence and surveillance detection are proactive in nature and supply the first line of defense. These methods focus on detecting people who are intent on causing problems before they make their move and attempt to do harm to the organization or its personnel.  In fact history indicates that advance notice of potential problems is the best, and often the only, chance to deal with them effectively.  Programs that rely primarily on protective intelligence gathering and surveillance detection have the added benefit of being low profile and unobtrusive protective strategies which are more easily accepted by protectees desiring minimal disruption of their normal routine.
Loose, close protection works well for principals visiting unfamiliar venues and specific events.  It helps to smooth out their experience and daily activities, an EP specialist gives them information about the logistics, facilitates easy movement, and provides guidance at the venue.
While the basic framework of the program is being assembled the next step of the process is to work with the key stakeholders in the nascent executive protection program to help garner their support to insure success. For the corporate community, the goal is to help them realize the value that the program will add to the function of the business as a whole by bolstering business continuity and supplying a significant return on their financial investment.  Prior to implementing the protection program an effort must be made to dispel the myths or preconceptions concerning executive protection.
If there is an objection to the program ,it is usually due to a misconception as to what the EP Program consists of – basically the objecting party has not been educated on the realities of the services that will be provided, nor do they personally identify with a need for the program. They tend not to realize that it has more to do with personal safety and logistics than it does with handling assassination attempts or shoot-outs.  The executive protection program exists more for preserving the medical health and safety of executives. It’s hard to make a vice president of a US based corporation relate to a kidnapping or assassination threat, however, they certainly know people who have had heart attacks or other medical issues while at work, maybe even they’ve had their own personal experience with that.  Educate them on the benefits that will be provided as far as ease of travel, and the opportunity for additional productivity at work so they can have more family time at home.  Emphasize the focus of the program to support business functions. Make your case to them using the language of business, explain the benefits in terms of productivity increases and the ROI (return on investment) they will realize.
The period when the phase-in process of the EP program begins is a delicate time for building a lasting buy-in with the stakeholders we have previously identified.  Obviously, making sudden, radical changes to the daily routines of the principles is to be avoided unless the threat or risk assessments indicate exigent circumstances exist that can be clearly articulated.  The simplest way to do this is to phase in the protective effort during special events and travel.  These times allow the EP team to highlight their role in providing logistical support to the principles as they are already outside of their normal routine and will be in need of information about where to go and what the itinerary is.  After they have been familiarized with the functions of the team incorporate those functions into daily business in the manner outlined in the EP program plan outlined earlier in the process.  The low profile, surveillance detection based philosophy discussed earlier will keep obvious changes to routine to a minimum while accomplishing the goals of the program.
The progress of the program will develop expectations on the part of principles and stakeholders. The on-going challenge shall be meeting the expectations that the program sets with how service is delivered. This is always an aspect of EP that needs consistent attention.  The best advice is to make it a point of having deliberate conversations between EP team members, and especially with additional EP staff members that are brought on-board on an interim or subcontract basis, about how the principles are serviced.  The goal of this conversation is to maintain a single philosophy about how the job is performed and what standards exist.
The twenty first century is providing new challenges to security professionals of all disciplines. Using executive protection to address the challenges faced by those who are responsible for the safety of high profile personalities is a strong option if it is executed correctly.  Developing a realistic plan with the help of experienced professionals is the best bet for long term success.  It is worth noting that specific legal issues and tax advantages were intentionally not discussed as they merit discussion with an attorney who focuses on “executive protection law”.  That being said, with planning and professional execution, successful executive protection can yield the level of threat and risk mitigation that is needed without disenfranchising other members of your organization.
About the Author:
Edward Limoges is the Director of Operations for Protection Resources International, an Illinois based provider of security consulting and security services to high net worth individuals, families and multi-national corporations. He is a former police officer with extensive experience in planning, managing and providing security for high net worth individuals and families. He is well versed in developing and implementing well balanced, proactive security programs for those who value their privacy.

Nightclub Bar Security

 

Nightclub Bar Security

by Chris E McGoey, CPP, CSP, CAM

Bouncers are often the most visible aspect of security in a nightclub or bar. Bouncers in city-clubs often stand out as the huge guys dressed in black. Bouncers and doormen are an important part of a comprehensive nightclub and bar security plan. However, employing overly aggressive bouncers and doormen with little training and inadequate procedures can contribute to the Death of a Nightclub.

Doormen

The doorman or door-host is the first person the patron sees and sets the tone for the style and attitude of the club. Some clubs employ burly-looking guys who set the tone of the “Barbary Coast” days in San Francisco where bothersome patrons would be forcibly thrown out into the street. Other clubs use well-dressed ladies and gentlemen to make patrons feel like they have entered a nightclub with dignity and class.

The true function of a doorman is to provide access control for a busy nightclub and screen those that enter. A doorman is traditionally the person who stands at the door and checks IDs to assure that each patron is of age to legally enter the establishment and is dressed appropriately. In some urban clubs, doormen use metal detectors and pat downs procedures where the format attracts mostly young people and has an expectation of finding weapons. Another function of a doorman is to prevent admittance to those that are obviously intoxicated or who have previously caused trouble inside the club. Most clubs have an “86” policy where objectionable patrons are barred from returning to the club for some designated period of time. Depending on the club, a doorman can be used to collect cover charges, tickets, or direct patrons to tables.

In addition to normal doorman duties, some nightclubs use the door staff to monitor patron conduct on the sidewalk as well as inside the club. The nature of this additional task can lead to confrontations with aggressive nightclub patrons if not handled professionally. Obviously, more training and experience is required as the doorman becomes more assertive and begins to assume more security-like duties. Most busy nightclubs begin to have problems at the door when too many duties are heaped on to an inexperienced and poorly trained doorman.

Bouncers

Bouncers are an enigma. The term bouncer presents an image of a brawler who will break up fights and forcibly eject obnoxious patrons. Bouncers are often portrayed in movies as tough, thug-like scrappers who love to fight, like in the movie “Road House”. Many nightclubs foster that image by hiring over-sized ex-jocks, wrestlers, or martial artists to handle drunken or out of control patrons. Usually these bouncers have little experience and receive no real formal training in criminal or civil law that they must apply. See my web page Bouncers Need Training. In a crisis, these inexperienced bouncers will be forced to rely on their own common sense and instincts to solve a problem. This can be a scary concept.

The duty of a bouncer is to monitor the crowd to see that everyone behaves. The goal should be to see that everyone has a good time, but within established limits. The best bouncers are personable, friendly and can talk to patrons without appearing threatening or intimidating. The best bouncers don’t bounce anyone…they talk to people. The mere presence of a well-trained bouncer will remind the patron that their conduct is being scrutinized and that their patronage can be revoked.

Floor Men

A better job title for a bouncer might be floor man or floor person. In the UK you often hear the titles of Head Doorman or Cooler. A nightclub is about the business of providing hospitality where people can come to relax, unwind, and have a good time. A good floor man will manage the patrons inside a club and will see to it that no one becomes overly aggressive and spoils the party. A well-trained floor man will circulate throughout the club, be highly visible, and be easily identifiable as a club employee. The floor man should continually evaluate the conduct and attitudes of each patron and watch for changes behavior. Let’s face it, drinking alcohol in a nightclub setting is designed to remove inhibitions and subtle behavior changes are expected. A floor man’s job is to recognize the negative behavior changes and begin to manage the patron. Good floor men will use eye contact and body language to let troublesome patrons know that their conduct is reaching the threshold for unacceptable behavior.

Rule Enforcement

It is up to the nightclub to set conduct limits and then require the floor man to evenly and fairly enforce those rules. The best run clubs enforce rules and do so immediately. A well-timed and discreet comment from the floor man about offensive language or noise level is all that is necessary, in most cases, to resolve objectionable behavior. Sometimes, second reminders are necessary followed by warnings that further conduct will result in being asked to leave the premises. Any patron who aggressively rejects a reasonable request to behave should be asked to leave. Remember though that rule violations are not the same as crimes. You can’t manhandle patrons or physically take someone into custody for violating a club rule.

The biggest mistake a floor man can make is to ignore a patron who has become a nuisance and hope that they will either calm down or leave on their own. The worst case scenario can occur when another patron is forced to confront an overly aggressive customer on their own because the floor man was oblivious to the situation. Ultimately, the situation becomes explosive, a fight breaks out, and the floor men are forced to physically separate and eject the brawlers. This is not only bad business, but can become dangerous for everyone involved.

Patron Ejection

Having to eject a patron from a nightclub doesn’t always mean that the floor man did not manage them properly earlier in the evening. Sometimes people come into a nightclub just looking for trouble, or can’t handle alcohol, or can’t interact socially with others. Sometimes, patrons bring their outside anger inside the club and no one knows about it until violence erupts. These people need to be asked to leave the club by the floor man as soon as their hostile conduct becomes evident.

No one likes to be asked or told to leave an establishment, especially if they paid a cover charge to get in. If a floor man has reminded the guest several times about their conduct then it will come as no surprise when finally asked to leave. If the patron is taken aside and discreetly told about the decision, the likelihood of an aggressive exchange is reduced. There is nothing worse than having a big bouncer-type approach a young man, in front of his friends, and tell him to leave. After embarrassing this young man, you are guaranteed to get a verbal barrage of insults and foul language that may escalate into a physical fight.

If it becomes necessary to escort an aggressive patron to the door, floor men should be well trained to do so. For safety purposes, a rule of thumb is to have at least one more floor man present than the number of people being escorted out. Unless a patron has committed a crime, floor men are generally not allowed to use physical force. This is not to say that you cannot slightly touch a patron to guide, direct, or block re-entry. Force should only be used in self-defense or for the purpose of detaining a criminal for the police. Punching, kicking, tackling, dragging, or putting someone in a choke hold are all inappropriate methods for floor men to remove someone from a nightclub. Unlike the movie “Road House” it is never appropriate for a floor man to punch a patron out of anger or because of a challenge to fight.

Escorting a patron out of a nightclub involves the use of professional verbal commands and a polite explanation of why they are being asked to leave. If a patron has been dutifully warned previously, then it will be of no surprise. If the conduct of the patron was obviously inappropriate, then likewise it should be clear why they are being escorted out. If the patron has been over-served and is intoxicated the ejection request may be more difficult.

If a floor man is expected to consistently enforce the rules, there can be only two ejection choices for the patron. Either leave the premises quickly and quietly or be arrested by the police. Once a patron has been asked to leave by the proprietor, they become subject to trespass laws if they fail to leave. In some states, trespassers can be removed from the premises using minimal holding force. Typically this involves one bouncer holding each arm while leading the trespasser from the club. Floor men must be prepared to take a little verbal abuse if a patron is asked to leave. Likewise, floor men should consider a refund of the cover charge, if any, for ejected patrons to remove that point of contention. If the patron becomes combative they may become subject to assault and battery charges and it goes downhill from there.

The floor man should be certain that the ejected patron understands that they must leave the premises immediately or be subject to arrest by the police. If the ejected patron attacks a floor man, reasonable force can be used in self-defense. Reasonable force can also be used to take an assailant in to custody for the police. If you do this, it is important to actually file criminal charges or risk for false imprisonment lawsuit. Under no circumstances should excessive force be used. (See my webpage on Use of Force Continuum for more details on use of force). Headlocks and pain compliance techniques (i.e. arm twisting, wrist locks) are not appropriate ways of escorting a rule-violator from a club. Chokeholds and sleeper holds should never be used except in life threatening scenarios. Floor men should also use care when taking a patron down to the floor, handcuffing, and piling on top. Intoxicated or overweight persons have died from positional asphyxiation from too much body weight pressing them to the floor.

Customer Fights

If two or more customers mutually get into a fistfight, they must be removed from the club immediately for everyone’s safety. The question is how to do it safely? The old fashioned method was to throw both parties out into the street and let them duke-it-out for themselves is wrong. The correct method is to delay the ejection of the more passive offender, if possible, until the more aggressive co-combatant has completely vacated the property. The reason for this is that it is foreseeable that two people who were engaged in a fight inside will continue the assault outside. The nightclub floor men have no legal basis for detaining someone unless a crime has been committed and cannot hold someone who wishes to leave voluntarily and continue to fight. However, the floor men has a duty to be reasonable and see that known offenders have left the property and to call the police if they know a fight is about to occur or if one combatant requests it.

 

Security Guard: Requirements for a Career As a Security Professional

 

Security guards monitor sites to prevent theft, vandalism, fire and other harmful situations. They’re responsible for maintaining the safety of employees, residents, guests and all people within an assigned location. Security guards may be required to use force against violators, and some guards are armed with handguns, handcuffs, pepper spray and other law enforcement tools.

Security Guard Requirements

Licensure

In many states, security guards are required to obtain licensure. Eligibility varies by state, but most licensure applicants must be 18 or older, have a clean criminal record and pass a drug test. Security guards may be required to complete formal training in a classroom setting. Licensure qualifications are generally stricter for armed security guards, who must also obtain firearms licensure.

Education Requirements

There are no strict education requirements for becoming a security guard. Employers prefer to hire applicants with at least high school diplomas or the equivalent. Some positions, such as those in casino security or investigation, require postsecondary degrees or certificates.

Certificate

Some community colleges and technical schools offer security guard training programs that lead to certificates. Many of these programs are designed to fulfill state licensure requirements, and vary in length according to state regulations. They typically consist of a basic training course that covers first aid, patrol techniques, disaster response, crowd control and ethics, among other fundamental topics. Certificate programs’ curricula may also incorporate hands-on, practical training on job sites and yearly continuing education courses.

Undergraduate Degree

Certain employers may prefer applicants with postsecondary degrees. Undergraduate degrees in criminal justice, law enforcement science or other applicable fields may give security guards an upper hand in the search for employment. Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice programs, for example, prepare students for entry-level positions in law enforcement. Courses may include investigation techniques, security management, psychology, juvenile justice and criminal law.

On-The-Job Training

Security guards typically obtain instruction on the job, in which case training duration and depth vary by employer and job duties. They may learn protection and defense methods, as well as how to write reports, deliver first aid and handle emergency situations. Security guards who carry weapons generally complete more exhaustive training than those who are unarmed, and they may learn firearm safety and force laws. Those who work in high-security settings often endure extensive training followed by strict supervision on the job.

American Society for Industrial Security (ASIS) International Training Guidelines

Some employers implement the training standards set forth by ASIS International, which recommends that trainees receive 48 hours of instruction in the first 100 days of service. Under ASIS International guidelines, trainees must pass examinations that assess proficiency in topics like crime prevention, emergency procedures, evidence management and report writing. They may also be required to complete annual continuing education courses.

 

Do You Need Security Guards?

Do You Need Security Guards?

July 2010

By Rene Faucher, Gray Duffy LLP
Published: Daily Journal

The security of your tenants and guests is always a main priority for you as a commercial property or building owner. But how do you know when you need increased security and what type of security system you should employ?

The courts in California have recognized that circumstances which make assaults reasonably foreseeable may create a duty to have security guards. Such circumstances include a prior incident of an assault or battery on a tenant or a guest on or near your commercial property, or several previously threatened assaults or even thefts in the vicinity of this property, as well as being located in a high crime area, or having a known presence of gang members around the property. Once you have made the decision to have security guards, who do you hire? What are the details you should consider?

Do You Hire a Security Guard or a Security Company?

There are many laws governing the rights and privileges of security guards that can often be confusing. Unless you know something about security and the laws that impact security guards, do not directly hire the security guards; instead, hire a private patrol operator who is licensed to provide security services.

If you hire a private patrol operator, consider having the operator assess your security risks to determine how many security guards are needed, what they are supposed to do, and where and when they should patrol. This is part of what is called the “security needs assessment.” A qualified private patrol operator with experience in commercial property and buildings will know how to make this assessment and you should ask them to provide this assessment to you in writing. This operator will then monitor the security guard’s background, licenses, training compliance and performance.

If instead you decide to employ security guards directly, take some time to learn the laws. Some of the most critical laws include: employee security guards may not be armed; security guards should wear a security uniform, be licensed by the State of California and receive the required training and continuing education courses; and security guards may be hired directly as employees, but not as independent contractors.

Licenses, Training and Firearms

A private patrol operator must be licensed with the State of California. You can check on the status of a license by going to the California Department of Consumer Affairs, Bureau of Security and Investigative Services website www.bsis.ca.gov. Each security guard employed by the private patrol operator must also be licensed and have formal training in the exercise of the power to arrest and other security officer skills. The private patrol operator is obligated to provide each security guard a review course in security officer skills on an annual basis and keep a record of its completion for two years.

The private patrol operator’s security guard may be armed but first must complete a course of training in carrying and using firearms, and then obtain a license from the California Department of Consumer Affairs. If the security guard discharges a firearm, the security guard must prepare a detailed report for the Director of the California Department of Consumer Affairs within seven days. A security guard can also carry a baton and/or chemical agents, but again, only after completing a course in their use and obtaining the required certificates. While there may be some debate in the industry, most experts agree that a security guard should not carry a large flashlight; this could cause problems, since there is a temptation to use them as weapons. A small flashlight is permissible. If the security guard conducts a citizen’s arrest, usually the police should be called, and the police can decide whether to release the person arrested or book them.

As the commercial property or building owner, schedule a time for you and your management staff to meet with each individual security guard to assure a direct line of communication. Also, it’s in your best interest to require your security guards to prepare written incident reports and provide you with copies of all events that occur. Provide each security guard with a cell phone to call the police and management and, if possible, a digital camera in order to best record all events. Remember, the security guard is your representative as well as another set of eyes and ears.

Insurance

When hiring a private patrol operator, you may wish to consider adding an indemnity agreement into the contract whereby the private patrol operator agrees to indemnify you for claims arising out of his/her security work. Additionally, have the private patrol operator’s insurance carrier issue an endorsement naming you as an additional insured. Finally, in the case of a claim or lawsuit, consider tendering your defense directly to this insurance carrier rather than your own since this could avoid requiring you to pay a deductible or self insured retention.

Importantly, the private patrol operator who employs the security guard who carries a firearm must maintain an insurance policy with a minimum limit of $500,000.00.

Conclusion

Security risks for your commercial real estate should be a serious concern to management. Your corporate structure is for the purpose of limiting your exposure to claims as is your insurance. Security guards can also increase the protection of your tenants and guests while supplementing your defense against claims. But, security guards require your attention to details in the beginning of the arrangement and thereafter.

Rene Faucher is an attorney with Gray•Duffy, LLP, who routinely represents security guards and their employers and has obtained multiple defense verdicts on behalf of these clients.

Please Note: This article is necessarily general in nature and is not a substitute for legal advice with respect to any particular case. Readers should consult with an attorney before taking any action affecting their interests.

Benefits of Having a Security Guard at a Business

Benefits of Having a Security Guard at a Business

by Amanda C. Kooser, Demand Media

When hiring a security guard makes business sense.

Small businesses have to deal with the reality that thefts and other crimes can occur on business premises. Some businesses, such as convenience stores, banks and retail stores, may be more of a target for criminals and petty thieves than other types, but a wide variety of businesses choose to hire security guards. Guards can be used to prevent crime, maintain security, and assist customers and employees. Business owners should assess the benefits of hiring a security guard before making the decision to bring one on board.

Sense of Security

The presence of a security guard at a business can provide peace of mind and a sense of security to the business owner, employees and customers. Employees that work in high-risk areas are more productive and easier to retain when they don’t have to worry about personal safety. It also lets customers know that you are concerned about their safety and willing to take steps to insure it. This may be particularly important for businesses that deal in very high-end merchandise or are located in high-crime areas.

Prevention

Simply having a security guard present is a great deterrent to crime. Thieves will think twice about targeting a business that has uniformed protection. Professional guards are trained to look for suspicious activity on the spot. They can assess a situation and react to security breaches. A guard is a greater visual deterrent than just camera surveillance or a standard security system. It sends a message to potential criminals that you are serious about the security of your business.

Customer Service

Security guards can also be customer service ambassadors. A guard may man a front desk or act as a sentry to control access to an area. This can mean that there is a substantial amount of interaction with customers and clients. Guards may be able to help direct people to find products and get to the right location in a business. Guard can also be available as escorts for customers and employees to get to their cars after dark. Hiring personable and capable guards lets you communicate that your business is secure and customer-oriented.

Handling Crime

Security guards can receive varying levels of training when it comes to actively responding to a crime. Some may simply take down details and contact the police. Some may be able to detain suspects. It is up to the business to decide whether to have an armed or unarmed guard, and what procedures should be in place for handling a suspect should a crime occur. Hiring a trained and licensed guard from a reputable company can ensure that the guard behaves capably and sensibly when faced with criminal activity on business premises.

Monitoring

Not all security guards spend all their time on active patrol of a business property. A security professional may be employed to monitor video surveillance, check credentials, check for contraband or restrict access to an area. A security guard may have specific goals, such as watching for shoplifters, keeping an eye on the grounds after hours, and opening or closing a business for the day. These monitoring duties take a lot of security responsibility off the shoulders of the business owner and employees, and allows them to focus on their jobs

Benefits of Having a Security Guard at a Business

Benefits of Having a Security Guard at a Business

by Amanda C. Kooser, Demand Media

When hiring a security guard makes business sense.

When hiring a security guard makes business sense.

Small businesses have to deal with the reality that thefts and other crimes can occur on business premises. Some businesses, such as convenience stores, banks and retail stores, may be more of a target for criminals and petty thieves than other types, but a wide variety of businesses choose to hire security guards. Guards can be used to prevent crime, maintain security, and assist customers and employees. Business owners should assess the benefits of hiring a security guard before making the decision to bring one on board.

Sense of Security

The presence of a security guard at a business can provide peace of mind and a sense of security to the business owner, employees and customers. Employees that work in high-risk areas are more productive and easier to retain when they don’t have to worry about personal safety. It also lets customers know that you are concerned about their safety and willing to take steps to insure it. This may be particularly important for businesses that deal in very high-end merchandise or are located in high-crime areas.

Prevention

Simply having a security guard present is a great deterrent to crime. Thieves will think twice about targeting a business that has uniformed protection. Professional guards are trained to look for suspicious activity on the spot. They can assess a situation and react to security breaches. A guard is a greater visual deterrent than just camera surveillance or a standard security system. It sends a message to potential criminals that you are serious about the security of your business.

Customer Service

Security guards can also be customer service ambassadors. A guard may man a front desk or act as a sentry to control access to an area. This can mean that there is a substantial amount of interaction with customers and clients. Guards may be able to help direct people to find products and get to the right location in a business. Guard can also be available as escorts for customers and employees to get to their cars after dark. Hiring personable and capable guards lets you communicate that your business is secure and customer-oriented.

Handling Crime

Security guards can receive varying levels of training when it comes to actively responding to a crime. Some may simply take down details and contact the police. Some may be able to detain suspects. It is up to the business to decide whether to have an armed or unarmed guard, and what procedures should be in place for handling a suspect should a crime occur. Hiring a trained and licensed guard from a reputable company can ensure that the guard behaves capably and sensibly when faced with criminal activity on business premises.

Monitoring

Not all security guards spend all their time on active patrol of a business property. A security professional may be employed to monitor video surveillance, check credentials, check for contraband or restrict access to an area. A security guard may have specific goals, such as watching for shoplifters, keeping an eye on the grounds after hours, and opening or closing a business for the day. These monitoring duties take a lot of security responsibility off the shoulders of the business owner and employees, and allows them to focus on their jobs.

Japan security firm to offer private drone

 

 

 This handout picture, released by Japanese security company Secom on December 27, 2012, shows a private drone, produced by Germany’s Ascending Technologies, with a small surveillance camera that can send live pictures of a crime taking place.

A Japanese security company plans to rent out a private drone that takes off when intruder alarmsare tripped and records footage of break-ins as they happen, a spokeswoman said on Thursday.

The helicopter-like device is equipped with a small surveillance camera that can transmit live pictures of a crime taking place.

“The flying robot could take off if our online security systems detect any unauthorised entry,” Asuka Saito, a spokeswoman for Secom, said.

“It would enable us to quickly check out what’s actually happening on the spot,” she said.

The machine with four sets of rotors is based on a model provided by Germany’s Ascending Technologies and equipped with Secom-developed software, camera and other devices, Saito said.

The company says the world’s first autonomous private drone for security use measures 60 centimetres (24 inches) wide and weighs 1.6 kilogrammes (3.5 pounds) and will allow factory managers to monitor areas left uncovered by static cameras.

Firms in Japan will be able to rent the drone as part of Secom’s online security system for around 5,000 yen ($58) a month some time after April 2014, Saito said, adding the company would also like to offer the service in other countries.